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Author Topic: Nietzsche Section Update  (Read 946 times)
Gareth Southwell
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« on: 15/10/10 @ 18:31 »

Just a quick announcement that the Nietzsche section has been updated. I will continue to tinker with it, but it is now in more or less the format that will allow me to build upon the material there easily. The annotated version of Beyond Good and Evil only consists of comments to the first three sections (Preface and Parts I & II), but the whole text is there (I trust readers will understand this partial offering, for the rest of the material is available in my published guide).

An exciting development is in the Further Reading section, where I have a guest contribution from Prof. H. James Birx, who has written extensively on Nietzsche, Darwin and evolution. Hopefully, I will be able to twist other arms and more contributions will be forthcoming - please contact me if you would like to contribute. Also, if you spot any typos, mistakes, or simply have any comments, please get in touch - comments are (almost) always welcome!

Next in line for development is the theory of knowledge section, which hopefully will coincide with the completion of my three-quarters finished guide to the same subject (due out next year, hopefully...).

« Last Edit: 15/10/10 @ 18:37 by Gareth Southwell » Logged

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pachomius
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« Reply #1 on: 15/12/10 @ 00:19 »

This is what I think about Nietzsche.


He is into a lot of gripes against God and Christianity and calls for abandoning God and the Christian faith, but nothing of any comparably constructive alternative does he offer.


That is what I notice, all mantras of gripes, but nothing constructive to take the place of the prevailing order of things in a Christian society.

A lot of philosophers of the late centuries are just into gripes but offered nothing constructive, instead destructive like the atheist communist reformers, to kill and to destroy, but afterwards when people got tired of them and their promised utopia, and the oldtimers despots passed away, atheist communism fell completely as an economic political worldview.



Pachomius
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Gareth Southwell
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« Reply #2 on: 15/12/10 @ 09:33 »

To be fair, this is a very simplistic view of Nietzsche. To say that he was just "anti Christianity and God" is not true, and just because you can't condense his philosophy down so that it will fit onto the back of a postcard doesn't mean that he didn't propose any positive philosophy.

Actually, I think there probably are parts of it that do stand out. Firstly, life is will to power. This means that everything you do and think is an expression of the lifeforce, and therefore you should strive to embody the most life affirming philosophy possible. Nietzsche's main criticism of Christianity was not that it favoured compassion and love, but that it glorified a negative view of life - it was life negating. So, Nietzsche's philosophy is life affirming.

Secondly, he rejects God because he sees it as an idea that philosophers and theologians have used to support their own view of the world. God guarantees truth, just as Plato's perfect ideas (forms) guarantee knowledge. All such things are philosophical dogmas that hide the fact that philosophers are really motivated by their own "will to power". So, this is really about self-deception. Nietzsche doesn't address the traditional arguments for the existence of God, for he is more concerned with why people hold that belief (the psychological reasons). Also, bear in mind that the much-quoted "God is dead" is actually only half the phrase; the second half is "we have killed him". So, Nietzsche recognises that the idea of God is something that can have meaning (although, perhaps, not in the sense that traditional believers might think so).

As for communism, or any political movement, you can't really associate Nietzsche to any of them. He was an individualist, and considered himself of no nation, a "Good European". All political theories were, to him, just a means of social control and an expression of something deeper and more disturbing than their professed values.
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