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Author Topic: "Judeo-Christian-Islamic Divinism" concept consultation  (Read 195 times)
GregKaye
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« on: 07/09/09 @ 16:22 »

I have recently produced a webpage on a concept that I have named Divinism and on the sites homepage I have defined Judeo-Christian-Islamic Divinism as follows:
the concept that considers that "God", as conceived within Judeo-Christian-Islamic religions, had a developmental origin.
I also commented:
"Judeo-Christian-Islamic Divinism" may potentially be interpreted to represent a substantial branch of Monotheistic Divinism but this is despite the fact that the most commonly used form of the word for 'God' within the Hebrew texts is typically presented in a 'majestically' plural form, that the Biblical 'God' engages in conversation within what is considered to be a regally pluralised identity ('Genesis' 1:26; 3:22 and 11:7) and that the Christian "Trinity" presents a clearly multi-faceted conception of God.
http://www.divinism.net/
A dedicated page has additionally been dedicated to the concept of Judeo-Christian-Islamic Divinism:
http://www.divinism.net/en/jcid.htm/
and I have included an invitation for the less theistically minded readers of the page to post their thoughts on the topic on this page.
Feedback related to the topic will be gratefully recieved.
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Gareth Southwell
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« Reply #1 on: 08/09/09 @ 06:25 »

Hi Greg,

I'm not 100% sure of the point you want to make here. Are you saying that monotheism is actually, in essence, polytheism? I understand that biblical language often pluralises the divine person (whether it is the trinity, the Elohim, or the royal 'we'), but this can also be understood by tracing the development of monostheism out of paganism, where there were many 'gods' or aspects of one divine reality.

Maybe you could expand briefly and simply?
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GregKaye
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« Reply #2 on: 08/09/09 @ 16:23 »

I guess that the problem is that, on some issues, I can tend to go into an amount of detail.

The central idea of Judeo-Christian-Islamic Divinism is that the "God" of the Judeo-Christian-Islamic religions (in whatever way this god may be conceived) had a developmental origin.

There is quite a bit of information that can be mentioned so as to indicate that many of the traditional arguments against this view cannot be firmly held and that may even be seen to be supportive of a divinistic view of God. 
http://www.divinism.net/en/jcid.htm
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Gareth Southwell
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« Reply #3 on: 09/09/09 @ 10:08 »

It sounds like you are arguing for (something like) what has been called Process Theology - the idea that God develops or changes over time. I like this idea, and I think there are (non-monotheistic) parallels. However, to argue that the big 3 religions can best be understood in these terms seems to me to be a theological/historical thesis, and not specifically philosophical. Perhaps you could highlight the parts of your argument that are philosophical, and set them out (briefly) here?

By the way, I appreciate that you have put a lot of work into outlining these ideas on your site, but it would be nice if you could simplify your position so that people at least know what your general position is (and therefore whether it is something that they wish to reply to). You can always add a link to your site for those who want more details.
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GregKaye
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« Reply #4 on: 11/09/09 @ 17:32 »

You rightly note the similarities that exist between Process Theology and the concept that I have proposed.
To my understanding Process theology indicates that God is changeable in that He is affected by things that happen in the course of events.

As far as the Theology of Religion goes, the one major contribution that can be taken from my article on Judeo-Christian-Divinism is that a number of theological points can be made to indicate that there may be little or no validity in various arguments that may be presented to support the idea that God has always existed. 
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Gareth Southwell
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« Reply #5 on: 11/09/09 @ 17:53 »

This is an interesting question, but the problem that you face in arguing that God may not always have existed is that what then created the universe? You would seem then to require some form of alternative explanation - either for the existence of the universe (if the universe is considered to have a beginning), or for the nature of the universe (if God is seen as responsible for its laws, etc.). If God is responsible for neither of these things, then the being in question starts to look less like God (at least, as traditionally conceived).
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